Public Programs for Adults, Teens, and Kids in March 2015

Saturday, March 7, 39 p.m.
The Brooklyn Museum 
Art and Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon
The Great Hall, 1st Floor

The Brooklyn Museum will present a variety of programs for adults, teens, and kids in March. Public programs include talks, nighttime events, performances, screenings, and hands-on workshops for children and adults that amplify the Museum’s exhibitions and permanent collection, serve its diverse public, and support learning through the visual arts.

Highlights include a special program on Verdi‘s famed opera Aida in collaboration with the Metropolitan Opera; a panel discussion on Punk and the Art of Feminism presented by the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Artand various activities including a dance party with DJ Rekha during Art Off the Wall, a special evening celebrating the artist Chitra Ganesh and the installation Chitra Ganesh: Eyes of Time.

Free with Museum admission

The Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art hosts a Brooklyn meet-up as part of the second Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon. Add authoritative biographical information about the women represented in our collections, or bring your own knowledge and information about feminist artists who need additions, corrections, or starts to Wikipedia articles. Reference materials, training guides, and a variety of experts will be available to help beginner Wikipedians create a more balanced source of information.

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Sundays in March, 11 a.m. & 1:30 p.m.
Arty FactsGo Figure

Materials fee (Museum admission not included): $10 per family (up to four participants); $5 for Gallery/Studio families and Members at the Family level; free to Members at the Friend level and above.

Children ages four to seven and their parents or caregivers explore the galleries, enjoy a team activity, and make their own art in each ninety-minute Arty Facts class. In March, students observe gesture and expression in works ranging from ancient  Egyptian figures to beautifully rendered portraits in the installation American Identities. Participants meet in the Rubin Lobby at 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Parents and caregivers are asked not to bring siblings older than seven or younger than four.

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Thursday, March 12, 7 p.m.
Panel Discussion: I Will Resist With Every Inch and Every Breath:  Punk and the Art of Feminism
Martha A. and Robert S. Rubin Pavilion, 1st Floor

Free with Museum admission

The Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art presents a conversation about the confrontational forces of punk rock and feminism through the provocative work and personal experiences of multidisciplinary artists, writers, and curators Osa Atoe, Johanna Fateman, Narcissister, Lydia Lunch, and Astria Suparak. Punk has long been a refuge for nonconformists, a platform for DIY experimentation, and a means for voicing rage. These panelists will discuss the aesthetics and politics of punk in their own lives and work. The event is organized by A.I.R. Gallery and the Women and Arts Collaborative at Rutgers University, and moderated by Leah DeVun.

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Sunday, March 15, 2 p.m.
Panel Discussion: “Burning Down the House: Rebuilding Juvenile Justice Together”

Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium, 3rd Floor

Free with Museum admission

Nell Bernstein, author of Burning Down the House, a heartbreaking and meticulously reported indictment of America’s failed juvenile justice policy, leads a conversation bringing together those who are entangled in, and those committed to fixing, New York City’s juvenile justice system. Presented by the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art in partnership with the New Press. Part of the ongoing Sackler Center series “States of Denial: The Illegal Incarceration of Women, Children, and People of Color.”

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Tuesday, March 17, 24 p. m.
Brooklyn Afternoons
Rubin Pavilion, 1st Floor

Free with Museum admission

Individuals with memory loss and their care partners are invited to join in for conversations about art. Program space is limited and registration is required (718) 501-6350 or access@brooklynmuseum.org.

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Thursday, March 19, 6 p.m.
Talk: “The Grand Temples of Egypt: From the Brooklyn Museum to the Metropolitan Opera”
Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium, 3rd Floor

Tickets: $16 and includes Museum admission

In honor of the 80th anniversary of the founding of the Brooklyn Museum’s Wilbour Library of Egyptology, the Brooklyn Museum in collaboration with the Metropolitan Opera, presents a special program on Aida, composer Giuseppe Verdi’s 1871 famed opera first performed in Cairo. This event will feature a historical overview of the Met’s Aida by author and Aida specialist Will Berger and a discussion of our Egyptian collections and their influence on this opera by Edward Bleiberg, Curator of Egyptian, Classical, and Ancient Near Eastern Art, Brooklyn Museum. A Q&A will follow the conversation.

Seating is first-come, first-served. To guarantee seating, advance purchase is recommended at www.museumtix.com. Free for Library and Archives Council Members and general Museum Members; to reserve, call the Membership Hotline at (718) 501-6326 or emailmembership@brooklynmuseum.org.

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Thursday, March 19, 7-9 p.m.
Figure Drawing: “Beats & Baroque”
Rubin Glass Pavilion, 1st Floor

Free with Museum admission

Sketch from live models against backdrops inspired by Kehinde Wiley‘s work while having a drink and listening to music. The session will be led by artists Nathan Sensel and DJ Sintalentos, the duo behind the figure drawing class Liner Notes.

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Saturday, March 21, 2-4 p.m.
Dance and Make: World Down Syndrome Day
Martha A. and Robert S. Rubin Pavilion, 1st Floor

Free with Museum admission

In recognition of World Down Syndrome Day, participate in an inclusive afternoon of gallery tours, hands on art-making, and movement workshops inspired by the exhibition Judith Scott-Bound and Unbound. Presented in collaboration with GiGi’s Playhouse. R.S.V.P. requested at access@brooklynmuseum.org.

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Sunday, March 22, 2 p.m.
Talk: “Prison, Women, and Change: A Conversation with Soffiyah Elijah and Susan Rosenberg”
Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium, 3rd Floor

Free with Museum admission

Susan Rosenberg, a former political prisoner turned writer and teacher, and Soffiyah Elijah, Executive Director of the Correctional Association of New York, discuss how movements for change and justice have developed over the last twenty-five years. What has women’s leadership meant for the prison movement? How has mass incarceration continued the long history of racism in American life? Presented by the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, part of the ongoing Sackler Center series “States of Denial: The Illegal Incarceration of Women, Children, and People of Color.”

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Thursday, March 26, 6-9:30 p. m.
Art Off the Wall: Chitra Ganesh: Eyes of the Time
Martha A. and Robert S. Rubin Pavilion, 1st Floor
Elisabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, Forum, 4th Floor

Free with Museum admission

 Art Off the Wall is a Thursday evening series featuring site-specific performances inspired by exhibitions on view. In March, explore themes in Chitra Ganesh: Eyes of Time. Activities include an exclusive screening of Ganesh’s video work; a talk with the artist and Saisha Grayson, Assistant Curator, Elizabeth A. Sackler for Feminist Art; a Bhangra dance workshop; a zine installation curated by Brooklyn Zine Fest; and a dance party hosted by DJ Rekha.

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Saturday, March 28, 2 p.m.
States of Denial: A Conversation with Piper Kerman
Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium, 3rd Floor

Free with Museum admission

Piper Kerman, author of the memoir Orange Is the New Black, leads an intimate conversation at this important and exciting moment in the prison debate. She’s joined by others who have survived the system to dig into themes of race, class, gender, and violence that inform our current understanding of justice. Presented by the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, part of the ongoing Sackler Center series “States of Denial: The Illegal Incarceration of Women, Children, and People of Color.”

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